Ann Ingalls, Bright Connections Media, "J Is for Jazz"
Soft / Music Magazines 2-11-2017
Ann Ingalls, Bright Connections Media,
Winner 2015 Annual American Graphic Design Award! The perfect way to introduce children to a truly American art form, and a work of art in its own right, J Is for Jazz is the cat's pajamas for all readers-little finger zingers through grown-up cats!

Be-bopping, lyrical introductions to key jazz figures, locations, musical terms, and a glossary of jazz slang are brought to life by author Ann Ingalls. Celebrated artist Maria Corte Maidagan, who most recently created the graphics for the Monterey Jazz Festival, draws readers into evocative and surprising scenes with her bold use of shapes and colors.

For 'axe' to 'zoot suit', J Is for Jazz will transport readers to the Jazz Age. With the alphabet as your guide, this fun and informative primer is sure to delight lovers of jazz, collectors of graphic design, and music history enthusiasts alike.

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